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Latest Press Releases

Corona meter update 19 October
Corona Meter Update: 19 October 2020

CORONA METER UPDATE OCTOBER 19th. 1. ACTIVE cases as a percentage of recorded infections were: Globally 22.5% Africa 15.5% South Africa 7.6% In Ghana, it was REMARKABLY lower at 0.8%…

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12 October cover update
Corona Meter Update: 12 October 2020

1. Ghana’s current official RECOVERY rate of 98.7% is well above the Global (75.1%), African (82.6%) South African (90.1%) benchmarks. 2. The unfortunate DEATH rate as a percentage of recorded…

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Power of the purse
The Power Of The Purse

The purchasing power of women is on the increase in Africa. Women are responsible for a significant percentage of buying decisions and the economic power of women as consumers and…

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CORONA-METER Update: June 8th – Facts on Africa

It is expected that recorded infections in Africa will reach the 200k mark soon. Questions surrounding the spread of the highly contagious novel Coronavirus continue to abound and there seem…

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“SAR-COV-2” THE CUNNING AND ELUSIVE CORONAVIRUS THAT GAVE THE WORLD A WAKE UP CALL – PART 8

COULD WIGS AND SYNTHETIC HAIR EXTENSIONS BE SAFE HAVENS FOR THIS CUNNING AND ELUSIVE CORONAVIRUS? JUDGE FOR YOURSELF BY PROF DOUGLAS BOATENG On 17 March 2020 it was reported that…

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“SAR-COV-2” THE CUNNING AND ELUSIVE CORONAVIRUS THAT GAVE THE WORLD A WAKE UP CALL – Part 7B

PART 7b: SA UNKNOWINGLY WELCOMED THE CORONAVIRUS MUCH EARLIER THAT WE THINK BY PROF DOUGLAS BOATENG Peer-reviewed research publications from among others UCL’s Genetics Institute, are increasingly supporting the hypothesis…

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“SAR-COV-2” THE CUNNING AND ELUSIVE CORONAVIRUS THAT GAVE THE WORLD A WAKE UP CALL – PART 7A

PART 7a: CORONAVIRUS MAY HAVE BEEN WITH US MUCH EARLIER THAN WE THINK BY PROF DOUGLAS BOATENG Peer-reviewed research publications from among others UCL’s Genetics Institute, are increasingly supporting the…

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“SAR-COV-2” THE CUNNING AND ELUSIVE CORONAVIRUS THAT GAVE THE WORLD A WAKE UP CALL – PART 6

PART 6: CORONA-METER WEEKLY UPDATE. JUDGE FOR YOURSELF BY PROF DOUGLAS BOATENG WORLDWIDE PERSPECTIVE: As at May 2, globally, (a) the three million (3 481 382) total recorded Coronavirus (SAR-COV-2) infection…

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Long-term socio-economic transformation starts with you.

As a continent we have to have a common supply chain and industralisation plan. Otherwise our so-called developmental partners will determine it for us but to benefit them.

Buying behaviours and industrialisation are inextricably linked.

Cheapest price does not always equate to the best value for money for business and/or society

The long-term success of the African Continental Free Trade Agreement (AfCFTA) is dependent on the region embracing supply chain management thinking.

Africa as individual nations is economically insignificant. Africa as one economic block is already an economic giant.

Africans may be surrounded by poverty but the continent is certainly not poor.

Do not always blame the government for your woes. Sometimes also critically look at yourself in the mirror and ask what role you have played in creating the woes.

Human beings by nature are risk averse and will not take chances with people they do not know and trust.

Our destiny is in our own hands.

There is no such thing as free money or aid.

Throwing money at poverty related issues may yield short-term benefits but may make matters worse.

Accepting hard truths and realities can change individual attitudes and society as a whole.

I may not have money to give you but I certainly have knowledge and experience to help you change your attitude towards long-term wealth creation.

There is a supply chain associated with every product or service. You just need to have a strategy and plan to develop and manage it.

Do your homework to appreciate what you have before going into negotiations.

The mere fact that I may not live to see my dream does not mean I should abandon my dreams for the African child.

Having self-respect, knowledge and purpose helps in navigating the complex journey of life.

Without a common understanding of supply chain management and its implications, the entire continent will continue to struggle to economically emancipate itself.

By just sitting back and hoping for change you are denying your own self and the African child a better socio-economic future.

The Africa Beyond Aid agenda starts with you.

Any country in Africa that through the governing party believes they can economically go it alone is leading its people down the wrong path.

Do not bargain with your supply chain resources for short-term price gains. Rather negotiate with these assets for long-term wealth creation benefits.

Beware of the ides of aid.

You have to be able to logistically move whatever you produce timeously, otherwise there is no need to produce it.

In addition to exporting raw materials and human capital, Africa is increasingly exporting hard currency to support the continent’s insatiable desire for goods made outside of the continent.

To build wealth that transcends generations you need to think beyond yourself.

As a business leader when you think South African your market is just under 60 million people. However when you think African your market is just under 1 billion people.

What you chose to buy based on price has an impact on a country’s long-term industrial development.

Mindset change is the greatest challenge facing Africa’s economic emancipation drive.

Some people use money to make a difference. Others use knowledge and experience to effect long-term positive change.

Accepting hard truths and realities can change individual attitudes and society as a whole.

The journey of life is not necessarily about how you started. Rather it is how you finished.

Made in Ghana or South Africa or Kenya still creates artificial boundaries. We must rather promote Made in Africa.

Supply chain management is simply about having a win-win shared vision in a value chain.

What I am doing is not for me but for the African child. I was once an African child.

As a consumer, do not just buy; rather strategically procure to support local and regional value-adding supply chains.

Supply chain management thinking and the continent’s long-term industralisation are inextricably linked.

Supply chain management decisions made today have a direct impact on you, your organisation, local industries and the future of the African child.

Limited understanding of supply chain management is a reason for the de-industralisation of the continent.

Economic empowerment is about long-term wealth creation and not about short-term materialistic entitlement.

Negotiating and bargaining are two different concepts.

We are constantly told to think outside the box. The big question is…who gave you that box that is being used as a reference point?

Trusting one another is one of the keys to long-term socio-economic freedom.

You know and understand your problem. You are the only one that can solve it.

For Africa to truly industrialise the definition of local must shift from national to regional and continental boundaries.

De-industrialisation is mainly caused by consuming what you do not produce.

An economically powerful Africa is possible through strategic industrial sourcing and changing consumer buying behaviours.

Economic empowerment is about trust and value-add and not colour-add.

I can only be happy when I see the youth and children around me also happy.

Understanding your supply chain gives you the competitive edge.

Long-term economic growth, company, industry and national competitiveness are achieved through supply chain management thinking.

I am who I am today because of what someone sacrificed for me.

Our ancestors selflessly strived to build a better future for us. Therefore we are duty bound to at least try to better what was started for the next generation.

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